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US AGM 8D Battery

U.S. Battery Manufacturing’s US AGM 8D Offers High-Performance Power For Marine Applications

U.S. Battery Manufacturing’s AGM 8D deep-cycle, maintenance-free battery is designed to increase runtime and service life for marine applications where reliable power is always needed.  This 8D group sized, 12-volt battery measures 20.5’ (521mm)L x 10.6” (268mm)W x 8.86” (225mm)H and has been designed to fit in tight compartments and can’t be easily accessed for routine or frequent maintenance required for deep-cycle Flooded Lead batteries.

The US AGM 8D deep-cycle battery has a 308 amp-hour rating at a 20-hour rate, with a runtime of 262 minutes at a 56-amp draw. This performance delivers the power your boat’s accessories need to run longer and reliably, powering everything from lights and troll motors to keeping your satellite and emergency communications equipment working during long voyages.  The battery’s internal structure features thick positive alloy grids for exceptional corrosion resistance, high-density positive active material, and advanced glass mat separators. These components work together to maintain the battery cell structure during deep-cycling, limit acid stratification, and inhibit internal shorts. The batteries also feature carbon-enhanced negative active material that improves charge acceptance and cycling performance. In addition to vibration resistance and main­tenance-free valve-regulated operation, the battery is one of U.S. Battery’s latest AGM designs that are engineered to improve reliability, overall performance and deliver a longer cycle life.

8D SAE post

8D SAE post

With a heat-sealed, heavy-duty, red ABS case, the US AGM 8D can handle working in harsh environments and comes with an F14 insert style terminal; an optional screw-in SAE terminal post is also available. More information on the US AGM 8D is available by downloading the battery’s datasheet.

Your Boating Spring Checklist Should Include Deep-Cycle Battery Maintenance

As summer approaches, boats often get a spring cleaning where the vessel gets washed, engines get tuned, and seals get inspected. Most often, the vessel’s batteries were removed for storage, but that doesn’t mean they should simply be plugged back in without checking them as well.

Most boats have two types of batteries on board, one for starting the engine(s) and a deep-cycle marine battery for powering accessories such as troll motors, lights, radio, navigation, etc. All of the vessel’s batteries should have been fully-charged before long-term storage, but deep-cycle batteries use for powering accessories need some additional maintenance to keep them working reliably.

Most boats will have a single 12-volt or a series of six-volt flooded lead-acid (FLA) deep-cycle batteries. These are the most cost-effective type of battery versus an AGM or maintenance free batteries. To get your FLA batteries in shape for summer boating, put on some rubber gloves and protective eyewear and remove the vent caps on the batteries to check the level of the electrolyte. The lead cell plates of the battery should be completely submerged in the electrolyte. If not, add distilled water to the point when the plates are fully submerged, usually, 1/4-inch below the bottom of the fill well in the cell cover. Do not overfill.

Once you are sure the battery cell plates are properly submerged in electrolyte the batteries should go through a full charge cycle. Once completed, check the electrolyte levels again and add distilled water to any of the battery cells that may need it.

Check for corrosion on the battery terminals and wiring. Corrosion can be cleaned by spraying a solution of baking soda and water to neutralize the electrolyte, then using a wire brush with a plastic or wood handle, the terminals and battery connectors can be cleaned. Use a silicone spray to keep the terminals and connectors clean and to prevent additional corrosion from building up.

Once your deep-cycle batteries are clean and fully charged, it’s a good idea to make sure you do not discharge the batteries past 50-percent. This dramatically reduces battery life. Battery manufacturers also recommend giving your deep-cycle batteries an equalization charge. This is an extended, low current charge performed after the normal charge cycle. It helps keep all the cells in balance. Actively used batteries should be equalized once per month and most battery chargers will have this function built into it. If you have an automatically controlled charger that doesn’t have an equalization function, you can unplug it and reconnect it after completing a charge to give an extra equalization charge.

Once you’ve provided the proper maintenance to your deep-cycle marine battery(s), they should give you optimum performance throughout your boating season. Occasionally, check the condition of each battery charge by using a hydrometer to test the cells and determine the state of charge indicated on the hydrometer and the battery manufacturer specifications. Keeping your marine batteries in shape will make them last much longer and allow you to enjoy your time on the water.