Battery Industry Associations Commit to Increase Global Recycling Efforts

While North America and Europe have a lead recycling rate of more than 99 percent, industry trade associations met among concerns that these rates were not the same in other parts of the world. In order to improve lead recycling efforts globally, the International Lead Association (ILA), Association of European Automotive and Industry Battery Manufacturers (Eurobat), Battery Council International (BCI), and the Association of Battery Recyclers (ABR), created a Memorandum of Cooperation outlining a framework for the development of a material stewardship program designed to support the environmentally responsible management of lead and other compounds, throughout the lifecycle of a lead-acid battery, from raw material production through battery manufacturing and recycling.

The memorandum issued by all four industry trade associations demonstrates an understanding that lead batteries used for energy storage, industrial applications, and in vehicles is worldwide, but improper recycling practices can cause health risks to the public and environment in areas where recycling rates are not as high as those in North America and Europe. In an effort to respond to these issues, these trade associations agreed collectively to address them by adopting a common set of principals, establishing continuous improvement goals, participate in knowledge transfer concerning environmentally responsible management of lead batteries, and to provide progress reports to interested shareholders.

The effort, according to the ILA, will help to advance environmentally responsible production and recycling of lead and lead batteries, in which the industry sees a global demand for this type of energy storage to increase thirteen-fold by 2024. More information on the agreement by the four trade associations and quotes can be found on the ILA website.

Battery Sorting, Training Key To Safe Recycling Efforts

Lithium-ion batteries have become part of our daily lives. They have proven useful for powering many of the electronics that we rely on, from cellphones and power tools to a growing number of electric vehicles. Their chemistry and construction, however, are not compatible with the process used to recycle lead-acid batteries. As a result, the Battery Council International (BCI) has growing concerns that more Lithium-ion batteries may be introduced into the lead-acid recycling ecosystem. The results of such contamination can result in explosion and fire that can cause injury to recycling center personnel and equipment. Lithium-ion batteries must be taken to a proper recycling location to be disposed of these facilities are not the same as lead battery recycling centers. Visit the BCI website to find out where to recycle lithium-ion batteries near you.

Properly Identifying Lead-Acid and Lithium-ion Batteries

Some of the best ways to tell the difference between a lithium-ion battery and a lead battery include:

1) Weight – Lead batteries typically weigh almost double that of a lithium battery of the same size.

2) Labeling – Lead batteries are labeled with the letters PB or have the word Lead Battery somewhere on the battery. Lithium-ion batteries have the letters Li or have the words lithium-ion somewhere on the battery case.

3) Terminal Styles – Most lead batteries have two protruding terminals with a light gray appearance. Lithium batteries may have a number of different styles of terminals.

If you’re still not sure what type of battery you have, you should remove the battery for closer inspection to find a label or other markings that may indicate the chemistry.

The BCI has created a toolkit that can be used by companies, to help employees identify and ensure that lead and lithium batteries are not recycled together.  The toolkit includes training videos, as well as a poster and flyer that can aid lead battery sorters and handlers with proper identification.

Video: https://youtu.be/4TPnUrENTRc

U.S. Battery Celebrates America Recycles Day (ARD) November 15th

Aluminum cans, glass, plastic, they are all products that most Americans recycle on a daily basis. But not many people realize that the lead-acid battery industry has a recycling rate that is 99.93-percent, making it the most recycled consumer product in the United States.

According to the Battery Council International, lead recyclers undergo some of the most restrictive emissions regulations. The process of recycling lead combined with tough emissions standards has produced new methods of recycling with reduced emissions that are far below EPA regulations. The BCI reports that contamination in the air has dropped by 99 percent since 1980. In addition, a recent study released by the BCI suggests that the U.S. lead battery industry enables more than 95,000 jobs for American workers and contributed more than $28 billion in total economic output to the national economy in 2016.*

It’s easy to see why many industries that purchase and utilize U.S. Battery Manufacturing flooded lead-acid batteries, have continued to utilize them to power everything from fleets of golf cars, aerial lifts, cleaning machines and more. In addition to reducing annual operating costs, industries and individuals embracing battery power are also doing their part to help the economy and the environment. Join U.S. Battery and celebrate ARD by returning any used flooded lead-acid battery to your nearest battery recycling center. For more information on how and where to recycle batteries, visit www.call2recycle.org.

*Lead Battery Industry Provides Billions in Economic Benefit, Provides Gateway to Middle Class – Battery Council International February 1, 2018

 

U.S. Battery Offers Solutions To Renewable Energy Storage That Are Also Environmentally Conscious

Looking For “Greener” And More Efficient Methods To Reduce Your Energy Costs And Flatten Power Curves? Visit U.S. Battery Manufacturing’s (Booth #3232) At The 2018 SPI Show in Anaheim, CA. To Find Out How.

U.S. Battery Manufacturing will be showcasing its line of RE-Series deep-cycle battery products, specifically designed for energy storage, at the 2018 Solar Power International (SPI). The show will be held at the Anaheim Convention Center in Anaheim, CA, September 24-27th, where U.S. Battery Manufacturing will have the latest information for optimizing energy storage for a variety of commercial and residential industries.

The SPI show is one of the leading trade shows for the Solar Energy market and allows U.S. Battery to offer a better understanding of how energy storage with the company’s RE-Series of batteries can provide one of the best solutions for reducing energy consumption and flattening power curves for streamlined efficiency.

In addition, U.S. Battery’s RE-Series batteries can offer SPI attendees the benefits of improved battery cycle life with the company’s unique features offered on RE-Series batteries. With a recycling rate of nearly 100-percent, U.S. Battery’s deep-cycle flooded lead-acid batteries are also one of the best environmental choices for long-term energy storage. For more information, visit U.S. Battery at the SPI show in booth #3232, as well as online at www.usbattery.com.

 

How To Recycle A Flooded Lead-Acid Battery

Recycling Deep Cycle batteries is one of the most important aspects of owning or using battery powered machinery and vehicles. Flooded lead-acid batteries used in golf cars, automobiles, floor cleaning machines, RV’s and more, are recycled at the highest rate of any commercial product; a rate greater than 99 percent.

Where to recycle batteries is the first critical step for this successful process to begin. According to the Battery Council International (BCI), a not-for-profit trade association formed to promote the interests of the international battery industry, batteries should first be identified. Flooded lead-acid and lithium-ion batteries are two very different types of batteries, and cannot be put into the same recycling process. Battery recyclers will indicate what types of batteries they can accept, so read the labels and make sure your batteries go to the right place.

The next step is to visit https://www.call2recycle.org. This website offers resources for individuals and businesses on where the best recycling locations are in your area. The website also helps to find recyclers that allow for drop-off or who offer pick-up services.

Doing your part to recycle batteries is key to continuing the success of the battery industry and its continued growth. For more information, visit www.usbattery.com.