U.S. Battery Employees Collect For Needy Children As Part Of Operation Christmas Child

U.S. Battery Manufacturing employees collected 218 boxes filled with toys, toiletries, and other items, as part of Operation Christmas Child (OCC), a Christian outreach program run by the Samaritan’s Purse International Relief Organization.

U.S. Battery’s employees have spearheaded this project over the last five years to help the Christian charity collect the Christmas boxes. The boxes are then distributed to pastors and community leaders in more than 100 countries and given to children living in remote areas.

According to the OCC, the Christmas boxes are often taken by boat, walked through jungles, or even travel via camel-back to their remote destinations. Samaritan’s Purse is a nondenominational evangelical Christian organization that has been providing spiritual and physical aid to hurting people around the world since 1970. For more information on Samaritan’s Purse or donate, visit the website at www.samaritanspurse.org. For additional information on U.S. Battery products, visit www.usbattery.com.

U.S. Battery Makes A Holiday Donation To Santa’s Posse To Deliver Food And Toys To More Than 1,200 Families And 3,400 Children

U.S. Battery is an annual donor to Santa’s Posse, a Washington state-based nonprofit organization that partners with the Clark County, Washington Sheriff’s Office. The organization collects and distributes food to more than 1,200 families and toys to nearly 3,400 children during the holiday season.

This year, U.S. Battery’s Western Regional Manager Dwayne Porter, handed the company’s charitable donation to Santa’s Posse. The funds will be used to help the organization continue its charity work. Since 1997, Santa’s Posse has helped needy families in the Clark County community, and with the many generous donations they have received, will be able to deliver food and toys on December 19th, 2021.

Donations to Santa’s Posse can be made via the organization’s Facebook page:https://www.facebook.com/SantasPosse/

 

INNOVATIVE SOLUTIONS TO MODERN BATTERY-POWER NEEDS

The rechargeable lead-acid battery has been in continuous development since its initial introduction separately by Siemens, Sinsteden, and Planté during the period of 1852 – 1859. Since then, battery manufacturers such as U.S. Battery, which is celebrating its 95th anniversary this year, have continually sought to improve upon the performance, life, and efficiency of deep-cycle batteries for various commercial and industrial uses.

Deep-Cycle batteries’ overall dependability, cost-effectiveness, and recyclability have enabled them to continue in widespread use since their initial development. When John Anderson took over the reins of U.S. Battery early in the company’s history, he believed it was essential to look for ways to improve upon the basic battery technology. Over the decades, U.S. Battery has continued Mr. Anderson’s legacy by modernizing and innovating deep-cycle battery designs in multiple ways. These improvements enable the company’s products to stay ahead of the changing demands of consumers and the various industries it serves.

One of the first innovations by U.S. Battery was to increase the efficiency of the grid alloys used in the current collectors called grids. Historically, during cycling, the positive grids would slowly corrode, and grid corrosion was found to be a primary failure mode. U.S. Battery improved upon the corrosion resistance of the grids by adding selenium to the antimony grid alloys. The addition of selenium acts as a grain refiner to produce a fine-grain alloy that increases its strength and electrical conductivity as well as reduces corrosion. The effect of this improvement is that positive grid corrosion is no longer a primary failure mode, and the cycle life of F.L.A. deep-cycle batteries has been significantly increased.

The active materials pasted on the grids in a battery’s positive electrodes have also been improved over the years. The active materials start out as basic lead sulfates, and tetrabasic lead sulfate (TTBLS) has been shown to provide the longest cycle life.  Historically, TTBLS crystals have been ‘grown’ in a process called hydroset.  Because growing crystals depends on many factors such as time, temperature, humidity, etc., the sizes of the finished TTBLS crystals can be unpredictable. U.S. Battery has found that through the use of crystal seeding additives, the size and distribution of these crystals can be controlled to produce consistently small crystals distributed uniformly throughout the electrode.  Using a process the company calls Xtreme Capacity, U.S. Battery was able to provide customers with increased initial capacity, faster cycle-up to the full rated capacity, higher peak capacity, and improved charging using the wide range of charger technologies used in various applications.

As improvements to the positive electrodes were made, U.S. Battery realized that improvements to the negative electrodes were needed to balance the active materials’ performance in the battery.  Improving the negative electrodes’ performance allowed U.S. Battery to increase the battery’s overall capacity and extend service life. To do this, improved expanders were used in the negative active materials to prevent the natural tendency of the negative active material to shrink or coalesce during cycling. U.S. Battery also found that in applications with limited time for charging, progressive undercharge can result in negative plate sulfation.  This is often referred to as a partial state of charge (PSOC) operation.  To improve upon this problem, it was discovered that introducing structured carbon materials such as advanced graphites, graphene, and nano-carbons can improve dynamic charge acceptance and control sulfation. This allows renewable energy applications with unpredictable charging from solar, wind, and other renewable energy sources to advance with greater reliability and energy storage capability.

When deep-cycle batteries are used in a vehicle, the motion of the vehicle continually mixes the electrolyte and prevents electrolyte stratification.  However, in renewable energy applications where the batteries are stationary, there is no mechanical mixing of the electrolyte.  In these applications, it is essential to recognize the importance of proper charging to create gassing to mix the electrolyte properly. U.S. Battery has developed special charge algorithms to provide the appropriate amount of over-charge, including equalization charging to prevent electrolyte stratification.

While these improvements on 100-year-old battery technology have kept industries worldwide running efficiently, U.S. Battery is continually searching for ways to improve efficiency further and maintain a level of cost-effectiveness. Once again, the requirements of battery-powered equipment have evolved, both for consumers and the industries that rely on them. U.S. Battery has responded with the development of new product lines that incorporate the reliability, longevity, and capacity that the company’s customers have come to expect. The latest generation of deep-cycle batteries has been shown to last longer, are lighter in weight, and feature a technologically advanced design that will meet the demands of the customer’s energy needs now and in the future. Designed in the U.S.A., the new product line will be available worldwide exclusively from U.S. Battery. More information on what’s coming from U.S. Battery will be announced in the coming months.

 

U.S. Battery FLA Date Code

How Old Or New Are Your Deep-Cycle Batteries?

Used and refurbished battery-powered equipment are abundant and are often found at great prices. Although the vehicle may be in good working order, it’s important to determine how old the deep-cycle batteries are. In most cases, battery manufacturers stamp or etch a date code on the battery indicating the month, year, and location of manufacture.

Reading the Date Code

U.S. Battery uses a stamped code on the terminals of its flooded lead-acid batteries. The top left letter stamped on the terminal correlates to the month it was manufactured (A-L refers to January to December). In this example, the letter “K” is the 11th month indicating the battery was manufactured in November. The number indicates the year 2014, and the bottom letter specifies the U.S. Battery plant where it was produced.

U.S. Battery Mfg. Co. Plant Codes

  • The letter “X” is for  Corona, California plant.
  • The letter “Y” is for  Augusta, Georgia plant.
  • The letter “Z” is the Evans, Georgia plant.

U.S. Battery Mfg. Co. AGM Date Code

On U.S. Battery AGM Batteries,  the date, month, and year on the battery case are etched into the top of the battery and are clearly visible. The date is in the format of DDMMYY or YYMMDD. In this example, September 15, 2014.

US AGM 8D Battery

U.S. Battery Manufacturing’s US AGM 8D Offers High-Performance Power For Marine Applications

U.S. Battery Manufacturing’s AGM 8D deep-cycle, maintenance-free battery is designed to increase runtime and service life for marine applications where reliable power is always needed.  This 8D group sized, 12-volt battery measures 20.5’ (521mm)L x 10.6” (268mm)W x 8.86” (225mm)H and has been designed to fit in tight compartments and can’t be easily accessed for routine or frequent maintenance required for deep-cycle Flooded Lead batteries.

The US AGM 8D deep-cycle battery has a 308 amp-hour rating at a 20-hour rate, with a runtime of 262 minutes at a 56-amp draw. This performance delivers the power your boat’s accessories need to run longer and reliably, powering everything from lights and troll motors to keeping your satellite and emergency communications equipment working during long voyages.  The battery’s internal structure features thick positive alloy grids for exceptional corrosion resistance, high-density positive active material, and advanced glass mat separators. These components work together to maintain the battery cell structure during deep-cycling, limit acid stratification, and inhibit internal shorts. The batteries also feature carbon-enhanced negative active material that improves charge acceptance and cycling performance. In addition to vibration resistance and main­tenance-free valve-regulated operation, the battery is one of U.S. Battery’s latest AGM designs that are engineered to improve reliability, overall performance and deliver a longer cycle life.

8D SAE post

8D SAE post

With a heat-sealed, heavy-duty, red ABS case, the US AGM 8D can handle working in harsh environments and comes with an F14 insert style terminal; an optional screw-in SAE terminal post is also available. More information on the US AGM 8D is available by downloading the battery’s datasheet.

User Manual Cover

U.S. Battery Manufacturing’s New User Manual Provides Complete Information On Battery Data, Maintenance, Safety, Optimization, And More…

U.S. Battery Manufacturing now provides customers with a User Manual that includes everything you need to know to get the most out of your deep-cycle batteries. “Our User Manual is like placing the entire knowledge base of our engineers and battery industry experts at our customers’ fingertips,” says Mike Wallace, U.S. Battery Director of Marketing. “We compiled all of this information into an easy-to-understand manual that is designed to help customers properly use and maintain their batteries from purchase to end of cycle life and beyond.”

U.S. Battery’s User Manual will be updated regularly and covers a variety of topics, including safety, installation, and storage tips, as well as proper maintenance procedures and performance optimization. Customers can also learn how to address frequently encountered scenarios and find links on how to properly compare battery features and capacities before making their next purchase.

To view or download the free interactive digital U.S. Battery User Manual, Click Here

off-grid RV camping

Increasing Your RV Battery’s Capacity and Overall Runtime

On Overlanding adventures where primitive campsites don’t have power hookups, your house battery may not be large enough to provide the power you need for the length of your stay.  On these occasions, one definitely does not want to run out of power for lights, cooking, or charging mobile devices. So if you’re venturing out into areas without power to plug into, it’s easy to add more battery power and run time if you have space.

Deep-Cycle Batteries and Amp-Hour Ratings

Many RVs come with a single 12-volt battery dedicated to the unit’s house power. To increase the capacity, you first need to make sure the battery is a deep-cycle model. Some RVs are outfitted with a typical automotive starter battery which works fine to provide lots of initial power to start an engine, but not for maintaining power over several hours for lights and other electrical accessories. Switching to one 12-volt deep-cycle battery is a start. It will provide power for a longer period of time, indicated in amp-hours (usually the 20 hour capacity in Ah).

Amp-hour ratings are shown on the battery label and will help you figure out how many discharge amps the battery can provide for however many hours you need to supply.  Here’s an example. The most common rating is the 20 hour capacity in Ah or rate in amps.  The capacity in amp-hours is found by multiplying the discharge time (20 hours) by the discharge rate.  The discharge rate is found by dividing the rated amp-hour capacity by the discharge time (20 hours).  For example, a battery that is rated at 100 amp-hours at the 20-hour rate would have a continuous discharge rate of 5 amps for 20 hours.  Similarly, a battery with a rating of 100 amp-hours at the 5-hour rate would have a continuous discharge rate of 20 amps for 5 hours, but its 20-hour capacity would be much higher than 100 amp-hours (probably closer to 130 Ah at C20).  When selecting a battery for a given application, it is important to use the rating that is closest to the average runtime needed between recharges in the application.  That, combined with knowing the total amperage your electrical accessories in your RV will draw, will help to determine how much battery capacity you will need.

Two-Batteries Are Better Than One

If you switched your house power to a deep-cycle battery with a greater amp-hour rating but find you still need more capacity, you can add another battery in parallel if you have space. Adding a second deep-cycle 12-volt 100 amp-hour battery connected in parallel, for example, will keep the voltage the same at 12 volts but will increase the capacity to 200 amp-hours.  This can double the discharge rate (10 amps for 20 hours) or simply run the system for a longer time between recharges.

If you have a large enough space in your RV to add more batteries, you can add a third 12 volt – 100 Ah battery connected in parallel.  However, it is not recommended to make more than three parallel connections.  If even more capacity is needed without increasing system voltage, another method is to connect 6-volt batteries in a series/parallel circuit.  Six-volt golf car deep-cycle batteries are designed with much higher capacity per battery. (200 – 250 Ah each).

Two six-volt batteries can be connected in series for 12 volts and then another set of two connected in parallel for 400-500 Ah or a third set in parallel for 600-750 Ah at 12 volts.

The difference in wiring batteries in series and parallel can be seen here. If you plan on attempting this upgrade, make sure to use high-quality large-gauge wiring and connectors, and talk to an RV electrician for any help in setting up a multi-battery bank system. Some systems like this need to be separate from the RV’s charging and electrical system. It will also require you to use a good-quality battery charger specifically for large capacity deep-cycle batteries. If Overlanding is a long-term lifestyle, many have also considered adding solar panels to the top of their RV to keep deep-cycle house batteries charged and provide consistent power when they need it.

While upgrading to more batteries is more expensive, the larger battery bank will lower your depth of discharge (DOD) on each battery to the recommended 50% or less. This will ultimately enable the pack to last much longer than constantly draining a single battery.

 

Recycling

Is It Cost Effective To Go Green With Lead-Acid Deep Cycle Batteries?

For many business owners making an effort to go “green” can be an expensive process, requiring investments in new equipment and infrastructure. But if a company decides to be more environmentally conscious by investing in battery-powered machines and vehicles, it may also prove to be a cost-effective choice. While switching to battery power reduces the need for plug-in electricity and combustible fuels for power, there’s also the added benefit of lower overall operating costs.

Deep-cycle lead-acid batteries are the most cost-effective form of power for these types of machinery and vehicles. According to Fred Wehmeyer, Senior VP of Engineering at U.S. Battery, lead-acid batteries provide more energy per cycle at a lower cost per kilowatt-hour than any other type of battery chemistry. That means that the use of lead batteries can translate to lower operating costs over time. It gives companies using them a greater incentive, knowing that the operating costs would absorb any up-front expenses.

In addition to lower costs, there are other environmental advantages. Perhaps the most important is that deep-cycle lead-acid batteries are a sustainable source of energy. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency recognizes lead batteries as the most recycled consumer product in the nation. The foundation for this has been the lead-acid battery industry’s ability to create a model recycling program, one in which essentially 100 percent of them are recycled. It prevents millions of used lead-acid batteries from reaching landfills, as it is a problem currently happening with other battery chemistries.

So the question that commonly arises is, if switching to battery power is environmentally better and more cost-effective, how can various industries and rental companies make the most out of their battery-powered machines and vehicles? The answer, according to Wehmeyer, is to make sure you start with a battery that is rated for the optimum power requirements of the application and the type of cleaning machine. Selecting the correct battery further minimizes the upfront costs of going “green” in this manner and helps to extend service life for continued low operational costs.

Batteries come with various capacity ratings, so Wehmeyer recommends starting with one that matches the duty cycle of the vehicle or machinery will require. Purchasing a battery with too little capacity will shorten overall battery life and increase annual operating costs because you will have to replace them more often. On the other hand, selecting a battery with more capacity than needed will add to the initial purchase cost without necessarily increasing battery life.  Also, Wehmeyer reminds us that deep-cycle battery cycle-life ratings are not always compared using the same basis by different manufacturers.  Typically, cycle life comparisons are based on the depth of discharge (%DOD) using the C20 capacity as a baseline.

To truly take advantage of the benefits of going “green” with deep-cycle battery power, it’s also essential to perform a routine maintenance schedule. This routine should include checking water levels and filling as necessary, performing a monthly equalization charge, and minimizing the total DOD to 50 percent or less during each use. Doing these things will dramatically increase battery life and ultimately lower operational costs that will make your investment pay off in the end.

Looking at how batteries play an integral part in being environmentally friendly, it’s easy to see why many industries have continued to utilize flooded lead-acid batteries to power everything from fleets of golf cars and floor cleaning machines to aerial lifts and more. In addition to reducing annual operating costs, industries and individuals embracing battery power are also doing their part to help the economy and the environment.

U.S. Battery Manufacturing And Delta-Q Technologies Partner In Battery Compatibility Program

Corona, Calif.- U.S. Battery Manufacturing and Delta-Q Technologies have partnered together for a new program called “Charged by Delta-Q”. The program provides tools that showcase U.S. Battery products that are integrated with Delta-Q in a curated network of tested and compatible battery and charging solutions.

“Delta-Q’s battery compatibility program strengthens collaboration in the industry. It supports battery and BMS partners like U.S. Battery Manufacturing as they pursue new markets by giving them the opportunity to show their affiliation with Delta-Q’s global brand,” says Sarah MacKinnon, Delta-Q’s Co CEO and CFO.

The ‘Charged by Delta-Q’ program is intended to empower OEMs and help partners market their solutions on a broader scale. “Our affiliation with the ‘Charged by Delta-Q’ program helps our original equipment (OE) customers select U.S. Battery products that are compatible with Delta-Q charging solutions, as well as view tested charging algorithms with Delta-Q that can provide improved performance, longer battery life, and maximum runtime,” says Don Wallace, U.S. Battery COO.

 

About Delta-Q Technologies

Delta-Q Technologies is a manufacturer of battery chargers, that improve the performance of electric drive vehicles and industrial machines, and is a supplier of choice for Tier 1 OEMs.  Part of the Zapi Group of companies, Delta-Q is headquartered in Vancouver, Canada, with a global distribution to service industries such as electric golf cars, lift trucks, aerial work platforms, e-mobility, floor care machines, utility/recreational vehicles, and new markets, like outdoor power equipment.