U.S. Battery Manufacturing Sponsors Homeowners Of Punta Chivato, Baja Mexico In Their Annual Bulls Only Dorado Fishing Tournament

The community of Punta Chivato in Baja California, Mexico is an area where most of the homes utilize solar power, many using U.S. Battery RE deep-cycle batteries for energy storage. Over the years, the homeowners have organized into a non-profit association that raises money for the local schools, as well as many other charitable organizations, with an annual fishing tournament that is now in its 23rd year. “Our first Dorado Fishing Tournament was in 1996,” said Bill Knerr, one of the event organizers. “We take donations and contributions from sponsors like U.S. Battery Manufacturing and at the end of our fiscal year (April), we either write checks or set up lines of credit at merchant’s stores, whichever is appropriate for a particular charity. U.S. Battery has been in our community for many years and their products continue to be a reliable source for energy storage.”

The 23rd Dorado Fishing Tournament takes place June 21st through the 23rd and offers cash prizes up to $1000 for the largest Dorado caught. “U.S. Battery is happy to continue supporting the homeowners in Punta Chivato not only because of their use of our products but also for their work supporting area schools and other local charities,” says Michael Coad, VP Sales & Marketing at U.S. Battery Manufacturing.

More information on the 23rd Dorado Fishing Tournament can be found here. Additional information on U.S. Battery’s RE-Series deep-cycle batteries designed for energy storage is available on the U.S. Battery website at www.usbattery.com.

Battery Safety Summit To Focus On Education And Safety Of Lithium-Ion Batteries

The agenda for the 10th Annual Battery Safety Summit is reported to be focused on lithium-ion batteries and their expanding application and use by consumers. The summit is scheduled for October 22-25, 2019 in Alexandria Virginia where, according to the Battery Safety Summit will discuss finding accurate test and models that are critical for predicting and controlling the complex electrochemical, thermal, and mechanical behavior of lithium-ion batteries. 

The summit also plans to promote effective safety strategies from battery manufacturers, scientists and regulatory authorities as the use of these batteries increases. The summit intends to continue safety dialogs for the integrating and implementation of lithium-ion batteries to meet growing energy demands. For more information on the Battery Safety Summit, visit https://www.cambridgeenertech.com/battery-safety

Your Boating Spring Checklist Should Include Deep-Cycle Battery Maintenance

As summer approaches, boats often get a spring cleaning where the vessel gets washed, engines get tuned, and seals get inspected. Most often, the vessel’s batteries were removed for storage, but that doesn’t mean they should simply be plugged back in without checking them as well.

Most boats have two types of batteries on board, one for starting the engine(s) and a deep-cycle marine battery for powering accessories such as troll motors, lights, radio, navigation, etc. All of the vessel’s batteries should have been fully-charged before long-term storage, but deep-cycle batteries use for powering accessories need some additional maintenance to keep them working reliably.

Most boats will have a single 12-volt or a series of six-volt flooded lead-acid (FLA) deep-cycle batteries. These are the most cost-effective type of battery versus an AGM or maintenance free batteries. To get your FLA batteries in shape for summer boating, put on some rubber gloves and protective eyewear and remove the vent caps on the batteries to check the level of the electrolyte. The lead cell plates of the battery should be completely submerged in the electrolyte. If not, add distilled water to the point when the plates are fully submerged, usually, 1/4-inch below the bottom of the fill well in the cell cover. Do not overfill.

Once you are sure the battery cell plates are properly submerged in electrolyte the batteries should go through a full charge cycle. Once completed, check the electrolyte levels again and add distilled water to any of the battery cells that may need it.

Check for corrosion on the battery terminals and wiring. Corrosion can be cleaned by spraying a solution of baking soda and water to neutralize the electrolyte, then using a wire brush with a plastic or wood handle, the terminals and battery connectors can be cleaned. Use a silicone spray to keep the terminals and connectors clean and to prevent additional corrosion from building up.

Once your deep-cycle batteries are clean and fully charged, it’s a good idea to make sure you do not discharge the batteries past 50-percent. This dramatically reduces battery life. Battery manufacturers also recommend giving your deep-cycle batteries an equalization charge. This is an extended, low current charge performed after the normal charge cycle. It helps keep all the cells in balance. Actively used batteries should be equalized once per month and most battery chargers will have this function built into it. If you have an automatically controlled charger that doesn’t have an equalization function, you can unplug it and reconnect it after completing a charge to give an extra equalization charge.

Once you’ve provided the proper maintenance to your deep-cycle marine battery(s), they should give you optimum performance throughout your boating season. Occasionally, check the condition of each battery charge by using a hydrometer to test the cells and determine the state of charge indicated on the hydrometer and the battery manufacturer specifications. Keeping your marine batteries in shape will make them last much longer and allow you to enjoy your time on the water.

RV Batteries, Getting The Most Power Storage

Most RVs have an electrical system that simply plugs into a power source. When you’re at a more primitive site that has no power or water, your RV’s deep-cycle batteries had better be in top shape to power everything from your fridge, lights, stove and more. Many RV owners don’t always think about their batteries until they stop working, so it’s always important to make sure you have enough energy storage to power all your RV’s accessories. 

The way to ensure your RV has plenty of standby power is to ensure the batteries have enough capacity to handle the power load of all of your RV’s accessories. First, It’s important to know that RVs require a deep-cycle battery for this purpose. These batteries provide longer lasting power compared to regular car starter batteries that are designed to provide maximum power for short periods (to start the engine). Each deep-cycle battery is rated in amp-hours (AH), a measurement of the battery’s capacity. Most are indicated in the amount of current in amps that the battery can provide for 20-hours. 

For example, a deep-cycle battery with a 100 AH rating can deliver 5 amps for 20 hours, or 20 amps for 5 hours, before being discharged. Discharging deep-cycle batteries more than 50-percent will dramatically shorten their life. This is one reason why many experienced RV owners use batteries with the most AH rating they can get. When comparing batteries, make sure you compare them by the same 20-hour standard.

RV owners also switch to using multiple batteries to provide extra capacity. In many instances, this is done by using two smaller 12-volt deep-cycle batteries wired in parallel that will increase the AH capacity rating and leave the voltage at 12-volts. If you really want to dramatically increase your power storage, you can also switch to using two 6-volt batteries that need to be wired in series to produce 12-volts. This can more than double your AH capacity if you have the battery storage space to do so.

Keeping your batteries from being discharged below 50-percent is key to making them last longer, as can checking the water levels in the batteries. In some RVs, it’s difficult to access the batteries for monthly maintenance so some RV owners also install a single-point watering system that makes it easy to add water to each battery from one access point.

For more information on selecting the right RV batteries and maintenance tips on making them last longer, visit www.usbattery.com