On Earth-Day, Industries Get “Green” With Batteries

The increasing use of deep-cycle batteries is helping various industries become leaner and reduce their impact on the environment

A variety of industries have been using battery powered equipment and vehicles for decades. The attraction to incorporate them was initially to improve safety. In the cleaning industry, for example, motorized cleaning machines were much safer with battery power, reducing the risk of trips and falls. In the access lift industry, battery-powered vehicles are more compact and maneuverable, answering the industry’s call for greater safety for works on jobs that extended 18-25-feet above ground.

As these and other industries enjoyed improved safety standards, they began realizing that there was a greater demand for battery powered vehicles because of the hidden benefits that weren’t initially apparent. Companies and industries using battery powered floor cleaning machines, access lifts, golf carts, fork lifts, and other equipment, realized that those equipped with deep-cycle lead-acid batteries ended up being more cost effective than those powered by combustion engines. In addition, with proper battery maintenance, many companies realized lower annual operating costs, and the benefit of reduced environmental impact.

The latter was realized when the Battery Council International announced that lead-acid batteries are one of the most recycled product on the planet, nearing 100 percent. As long as recycling efforts are adhered to, and avoiding recycling lithium-ion batteries in lead-acid battery recycling centers, industries that adopted battery powered equipment are also “greener” than they once thought.

Deep-cycle batteries are also being seriously considered for a growing need for energy storage from alternative energy sources such as wind and solar power. During a recent Advanced Energy Storage Caucus in Washington DC, representatives discussed how energy storage is the future of renewable energy and that environmental concerns are also an issue. The discussions also could not ignore the environmental life cycle of deep-cycle lead-acid batteries and their 150-year proven track record within a variety of industries.

With a variety of benefits, there’s clearly a shift towards using battery power that can help many industries change how these batteries are viewed, their safety record, and as an environmental leader.

U.S. Battery’s Manufacturing Facilities In Georgia Receive 2018 Award For Excellence In Client Solutions

The U.S. Institute of Trade & Commerce recognized U.S. Battery Manufacturing’s Augusta and Evans, Georgia plants with the 2018 Excellence Award for Client Solutions. The award focused on U.S. Battery’s commitment to providing its customers with a high level of service that exceeds industry benchmarks, and its ability to manage shipments of product to local and global distributors quickly and efficiently.

“Since 1926, U.S. Battery has made customer service and product quality its top priorities,” says Terry Agrelius, U.S. Battery President and CEO. “Our employees and management staff continuously strive to provide our customers with outstanding service, in order to consistently meet the needs of our global distributors.”

U.S. Battery’s Augusta and Evans, Georgia plants are the largest of the company’s three manufacturing facilities and distribute its deep-cycle battery products to the company’s global customer base. Over the years, the company has received numerous awards and accolades for its product quality, customer service, and on-time delivery.

“It’s always gratifying to be recognized for our efforts, but it’s our high standards that have kept U.S. Battery at the top of the deep-cycle battery industry for decades,” says Agrelius. “Our customers know U.S Battery products perform beyond their expectations, and that our service is top-notch. This is why they continue to do business with us and the reason why more companies in a variety of industries are switching to our products.” U.S. Battery continues to push the boundaries of battery power and in the process, is being recognized as the most respected deep-cycle battery manufacturer in the industry.

Checklist For Charging Deep-Cycle Batteries

When it seems like your deep-cycle batteries aren’t operating at full capacity, it may be that they’re not getting a full charge. Undercharging deep-cycle batteries is a common occurrence, especially when they are constantly being used and there’s a rush to get them back in use before they are fully charged. To ensure your batteries are getting a full-charge every time, follow this checklist of procedures from battery manufacturers that can ensure your deep-cycle batteries are getting a full charge.

Before starting you’ll need to make sure the vehicle the batteries are installed in is off, and that you are working in a well ventilated area and with proper safety equipment such as goggles and gloves. Have a hydrometer handy so you can measure the battery’s state of charge, which is a simple but very effective way to verify your batteries are at full charge.

1) Always charge your batteries as soon as possible and try to limit the depth of discharge to 50 percent to maximize battery life. If you can’t keep track of the depth of discharge, you can’t go wrong by always charging the batteries after every use.

2) Connect the charger to the battery or battery pack and allow it to go through a complete charge cycle until it shuts off.

3) Check the state-of-charge (SOC) of the battery pack by using a hydrometer to measure the specific gravity readings. A fully charged battery usually has a specific gravity reading close to 1.275, but check with the battery manufacturer for this specific full charge reading.

4) If the charger turns off before the batteries are fully charged, unplug and restart the charger.  If it continues to turn off before the batteries are fully charged, consult the vehicle and/or charger manufacturer for corrective actions. 

5) If the charger is working properly, it’s always a good idea to perform an equalizing charge at least once a month. This will cause the electrolyte to gas (bubble) and reduce the chance of stratification, which can lower battery life.

6) Check the electrolyte levels on each battery after charging and add distilled water using a watering pitcher or with a single point watering system. Check with your battery manufacturer to determine the correct levels. These basic steps will ensure your batteries are getting the maximum performance and life. It is important to also regularly check your charger to make sure it’s working properly, and keep it stored in an area where it won’t get damaged. To find additional resources on charger diagnostics, battery maintenance and ways to increase battery efficiency and service life, visit U.S. Battery’s website at www.usbattery.com.