U.S. Battery Showcases The Electric MOKE During The 2018 PGA Accessory Show

U.S. Battery Manufacturing teamed up with Moke America at the 2018 PGA Merchandise show in Orlando, Florida, to showcase an electric powered version of an iconic vehicle called the Moke. The eMoke is a new version of this unique looking four-passenger vehicle that uses an electric engine, powered by 10 U.S. Battery US AGM 2224 six-volt batteries

USB-Moke-AGMsThis compact vehicle has been around for 50-years and was originally designed by Alec Issigonis of the British Motor Corporation, who was also the designer of the MINI Cooper. With its roots in the British military, and used for decades as means of transportation around exotic locations such as St Tropez, the Moke was made famous by actress Brigitte Bardot who was one of the vehicle’s earliest fans. The vehicle was reborn in 2016 after it had ceased production in the ‘80’s, when it was powered by a 1-liter DOHC gasoline engine.

Teaming up with U.S. Battery, Moke America is promoting this new electric model as the perfect golf, vacation, and retirement home vehicle, allowing for more mobility, comfort and customization than traditional electric vehicles currently in use. For more information on this vehicle, visit Moke America at https://mokeamerica.com.

To learn more about U.S. Battery’s AGM and Flooded Lead-Acid products for a variety of electric vehicles like the Moke, visit U.S. Battery online at www.usbattery.com.

Illinois Doctor Uses U.S. Battery 12-Volt Deep-Cycle Batteries To Covert His BMW To Electric

With only a 12-mile commute to his office, Dr. Karl Klontz thought it would be environmentally responsible to convert his 1994 BMW 318i from gas to electric power, which would also coincide with his solar energy lifestyle. “As a hobby, I work with solar power, going abroad annually to install solar arrays at schools, clinics, and hospitals in developing nations at no cost to the recipients,” says Klontz. “I decided to make the car electric as I’d already installed small solar arrays on my house to power the lights and appliances.”

Klontz electric motor Klontz realized he used his vehicle on a daily basis and that it consumes the most energy out of all his possessions. “I figured my car was a candidate, so I converted it to electric in order to commute to my job 12 miles away each day,” said Klontz. The conversion of his BMW to electric wasn’t easy, but he managed to gather up the components and put it all together to make it work. “The trickiest parts were finding the proper alignment and bracing for connecting the electric motor to the drivetrain, and the arrangement of the electric components,” said Klontz. “I worked slowly over two years to complete the project in my free time.”

The vehicle is powered by nine U.S. Battery US12V XC2 deep-cycle batteries wired in series that make up a 108-volt system. “I’ve heard from a number of sources in electric car conversion circles, that U.S. Battery products were very reliable providers of energy for jobs such as the one I undertook,” said Klontz. He checked into using Lithium-ion batteries, but the cost was prohibitive. Nonetheless, Klontz’s conversion works fine for his daily driving routine.

“The system has lasted roughly two years with approximately 1,400 charge/discharge US Batterys in Klontz conversioncycles,” says Klontz. “With the car in its fifth year of running, I’ve logged nearly 20,000 miles on the vehicle.” Klontz is well versed in making flooded lead-acid batteries last and adds a maintenance routine to keep the batteries in top condition. “I rely on a number of strategies to keep the batteries running as long as possible,” says Klontz. “I try not to discharge them too deeply on any drive. I recharge them immediately after making each trip, particularly in cold weather. I check their fluid levels regularly. I keep the terminals clean, and I check their individual cell specific gravity at the first sign of any voltage lowering.”

Since Klontz recharges the batteries using the solar array in his home, the cost to operate his car dropped to almost nothing, and his carbon footprint is greatly reduced. Overall, the conversion and its advantages showcase what’s possible and Klontz is happy with what he’s accomplished. “If I were to convert another car to all-electric, I’d choose a lighter model,” said Klontz. Lighter models, however, come with less overall structural protection for the driver, and the BMW has proven to be an exceptionally rigorous vehicle in terms of suspension, brakes, and other underlying features.”

 

Keep The Batteries In Your Golf Car During Winter Storage

Golf car owners often develop their methods of battery maintenance from talking to other golf car owners. The problem is that not all of these methods are always correct and can lead to poor battery performance. According to one U.S. Battery dealer, Jim Naughton Sr. at Jim’s Cart N Parts in Milton, Wisconsin, he’s heard many stories of battery maintenance, especially from elderly customers from retirement communities.

Cart N Parts is a large dealer of new and used golf cars and is located in an area where there are lots of retirement communities where the elderly use golf cars to get around. During the winter months, one consistent maintenance myth he hears is to remove the batteries from the golf car when it’s in storage. “Some people think they need to take out the batteries, not realizing that the golf car can help shield the batteries from the cold,” says Naughton.

According to Naughton and engineers at U.S. Battery, to properly store a golf car away for the winter, keep the batteries in the vehicle and fully charge them. This will help prevent the electrolyte from expanding in freezing temperatures, which can damage the batteries. Most new chargers have a charging maintenance feature, allowing the charger to remain plugged in all winter to keep batteries fully charged until the spring. Following these tips, with regular maintenance, will allow your golf car batteries to provide optimum performance and extend their life. For more information and safety tips on battery maintenance, visit www.usbattery.com.