U.S. Battery Manufacturing Helps A Shore Boat Convert To Electric Power

U.S. Battery Manufacturing provides the battery power for the Newport Harbor Yacht Club’s shore boat in Southern California. The shore boat was recently retrofitted to run on electric power, and uses 16 U.S. Battery US-L16HCXC2 deep-cycle batteries to power the 90 horsepower Duffy electric engine. According to Pat Werner, vice commodore of the Newport Harbor YC, the engine cost $10,000, but estimates that the electric system will be able to pay for itself within five years and save the yacht club an estimated $5,000 annually in fuel costs.

U.S. Battery’s US-L16HCXC2 deep-cycle batteries were used because they feature exclusive XC2™ formulation and Diamond Plate Technology® that create the industry’s most efficient battery design. This allows U.S. Battery products to deliver the highest initial capacity and highest rated capacity through the life of the battery. This plate technology also allows U.S. Battery’s products to reach peak capacity in fewer cycles, provide higher total energy delivery, and extend service life. This level of battery performance allows the Newport Harbor YC to achieve better pulling power, zero emissions, and with proper maintenance, a service life expectancy of 10 years or more. ’’The U.S. Battery products are outstanding,” says Anthony Palacios, Newport Harbor YC dock master. “Because the batteries hold a consistent charge and require very minimal maintenance, especially with the addition of a single point watering system, it makes the care of the batteries so much more efficient. In addition, the motor runs smooth and without lack of power. U.S. Battery always stands by their product and the customer service is always a pleasure to deal with.”

The 52 year old shore boat serves as a reliable water taxi service that takes up to 20 passengers to their vessels in the mooring fields in Newport Harbor in Southern California. The yacht club hopes that this type of conversion catches on and begins a trend towards zero emissions vehicles in harbors across the country to provide reliable service that is economical and efficient. U.S. battery products are manufactured in the U.S.A. and distributed worldwide. For more information, contact U.S. Battery Manufacturing, 1675 Sampson Ave. Corona, CA 92879. (800) 695-0945. Visit www.usbattery.com.

U.S. Battery Attends The International Work Boat Show & Conference In New Orleans, Louisiana

U.S. Battery is teaming up with one of its dealers, Battery Sales And Service, to display at the 2014 International Work Boat Show & Conference, held in New Orleans, LA December 3rd thru the 5th. The show is host to more than 1,000 marine product and service suppliers who connect with thousands of buyers for fleet and independent vessel owner/operators. “The International Work Boat Show is a great place for us to team up with dealers like Battery Sales And Service, and provide additional information and product support for a variety of companies in the marine industry,” says George Stratis, U.S. Battery Southeastern Regional Sales Manager.

With many marine vessels equipped with electronic appliances, stereo systems, radar, GPS and other accessories, it places a high parasitic load that can quickly cut the service life of an ordinary battery. U.S. Battery’s Marine deep-cycle batteries are designed to withstand discharge cycling, while providing higher initial capacity, performance, and longer service life that can save money and lower annual operational costs. Marine operators and suppliers attending the show, are invited to Booth #3754 to learn more about U.S. Battery marine products.

For more information, contact U.S. Battery Manufacturing, 1675 Sampson Ave. Corona, CA 92879. (800) 695-0945. Visit www.usbattery.com.

Winter Storage And Maintenance Tips For Flooded Lead Acid Batteries

Flooded lead-acid batteries used in a variety of applications have charge and discharge rates that depend highly upon temperature. While warmer climates tend to speed-up charging and discharging rates, cold winter months can slow down the rate of charge/discharge. In addition to affecting rates, colder temperatures also carry the risk of freezing the electrolyte if the battery is not stored properly.

One of the most common mistakes during winter months is storing flooded lead-acid batteries in a discharged state. A discharged battery in extremely cold temperatures will allow the electrolyte to freeze, causing it to expand. Electrolyte expansion can crack the battery case, causing a leak or complete battery failure. A fully charged battery has a freezing point around -80 °F while a discharged battery has a freezing point around 20 °F. By keeping the battery fully charged during the winter months, the electrolyte is less likely to freeze and cause unexpected failures.

With that said, don’t expect to charge your batteries and come back in the spring expecting everything to be okay. In cases where complete vehicle fleets are stored away during the winter, it is important to consistently check the battery’s state of charge by taking specific gravity readings. Like charging rates, temperature also affects your readings, so it’s important to add a correction factor that varies with the electrolyte temperature. The optimum temperature to take a hydrometer reading is 80 °F (27 °C). As a rule of thumb, subtract four points (.004) from your hydrometer reading for every 10-degrees below 80 °F (5.6-degrees below 27 °C). For example; if the temperature of the electrolyte is 50 °F and your battery specific gravity reading is 1.200, you must subtract .012 from your reading. In this case .004 for every 10-degrees equals .012. Subtract this from 1.200 and your corrected specific gravity reading is 1.188. In this example, the battery cell is less than 50 percent charged and should be recharged before being put into winter storage; (a fully charged battery should read approximately 1.270). If your corrected specific gravity readings are low, fully charging the batteries will put them in a safe state for storage.

Temperature also effects charge and discharge rates. A cold battery will charge and self-discharge slower than a warm battery, but will also exhibit lower capacity. This is especially true for battery powered fleets that are that are able to operate in colder temperatures during winter months. Although these fleets may not experience freezing temperatures, the cold temperature increases the resistance in the battery’s chemistry and causes a reduction in battery capacity. A general rule of thumb for capacity is for every 15-20 degrees below 80 °F, the battery loses 10 percent of its capacity.

The ability to check specific gravity readings in flooded lead-acid batteries is an advantage in cold weather operation. It allows the operator to fully understand the effects of cold temperature on the batteries, and allows them to be properly maintained. While the downside of storing or operating golf car batteries in the winter requires regular specific gravity checks, one positive aspect is that colder temperatures also reduce self-discharge rates. In the long run, taking the time to check the state of charge on your fleet’s batteries will ultimately be more cost effective than having to replace one or more damaged batteries. To find additional resources on battery maintenance and ways to increase battery efficiency and service life, visit U.S. Battery’s website at www.usbattery.com.

By Fred Wehmeyer, Senior Vice President/Engineering U.S. Battery Manufacturing[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]